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Noob question, but I read that the LX and Sport trims of the 11th gen Civic have i-VTEC. Can anyone confirm this information? Second, how would one go about "engaging" VTEC in a CVT? Wouldn't the transmission prevent the engine from reaching the high RPMs it needs to reach the VTEC range?

New to VTEC and CVTs in general, so looking to learn more. Thanks!
 

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2019 Honda Civic Coupe EX - Aegean Blue
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Noob question, but I read that the LX and Sport trims of the 11th gen Civic have i-VTEC. Can anyone confirm this information? Second, how would one go about "engaging" VTEC in a CVT? Wouldn't the transmission prevent the engine from reaching the high RPMs it needs to reach the VTEC range?

New to VTEC and CVTs in general, so looking to learn more. Thanks!
Someone may have to correct me but my understanding of the engine breakdown is that the 2.0 engines have i-VTEC while the 1.5T engines now have VTEC on the exhaust side. As for the CVT, you can totally redline a CVT if you floor it. In fact, to really feel the CVTs "fake gear steps" you pretty much have to floor it, otherwise it defaults to more of the steady rpm holding during lighter throttle application. Just like a normal stepped automatic the CVT logic will "shift" based on a variety of factors like throttle input, speed, etc. If you floor the gas pedal (especially in sport mode on applicable models) the CVT has no issues getting into the upper rpm range where VTEC lives.
 

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i-vtec is activated by oil pressure, not strictly rpms. There’s a few variables that make it kick in such as throttle position, duration of acceleration, and rpm.
 

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i-vtec is activated by oil pressure, not strictly rpms. There’s a few variables that make it kick in such as throttle position, duration of acceleration, and rpm.
Sorry I have to say your wrong

VTEC kicks in only at higher RPM's toward the end of the power curve.
Never heard it been activated (if equipped) at low RPM

I think @ above 4800 is a good guess but it all depend how far and how long you keep your foot the floor.

Here is what google says:

At 3000-5400 RPM, depending on load, one of the VTEC solenoids engages, which causes the second valve to lock onto the first valve's camshaft lobe. Also called 16-valve mode, this method resembles a normal engine operating mode and improves the mid-range power curve.
 

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I-VTEC uses variable cam timing only, it does not change cam lift, only duration. It changes cam duration for better low end torque and changes for higher rpm power, and in between for mid range etc. , it can change at any rpm and any throttle input level, it is almost continuous, no switch point like traditional VTEC systems.

VTEC changes cam lift and duration , it changes at a point in the rpm band , low rpm cam lobes promote low end power, high rpm cam lobes promote high end power. The VTEC 1.5L motors also have variable cam timing so they use both systems. VTEC is only on the exhaust side on the current motors, no need to have it on the intake side as boost can pump in all of the air flow needed.
 
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