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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have 2022 Civic LX. During normal driving, "D", the rpm is always at lower 1000. It may get just over 2000 rpm if I push it hard. It never reached 3000 rpm. As matter of fact, the letters of 4, 5, 6, 7 thousand rpm are all grey out. So, does it mean the car will never reach 4000 rpm?
 

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I have 2022 Civic LX. During normal driving, "D", the rpm is always at lower 1000. It may get just over 2000 rpm if I push it hard. It never reached 3000 rpm. As matter of fact, the letters of 4, 5, 6, 7 thousand rpm are all grey out. So, does it mean the car will never reach 4000 rpm?
Did you just get the car? Mine held back the first few thousand miles
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Did you just get the car? Mine held back the first few thousand miles
Thank you very much for your reply.

Yes, it is only 1 week old and I put 200 miles on it. Wow, the car is smart and it can help me to do a proper break-in.

Anyone has seen a document from Honda explains this function?
 

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Civics normally run in the 1000-2000 RPM range. Especially a naturally aspirated 2.0. I highly doubt they have RPM regulated for the break in. That is something that they do on new Corvettes, etc. If you were to stand on the gas you will pass 2K RPM. However I wouldn't for now. Just keep doing what you are doing. After 500 miles or so, tromp on it and see what it will do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Just to make it clear to everyone what I am talking about, I link 2 photos from a different thread below. You can see the 4, 5, + numbers are "grey out" comparing to the 1, 2, and 3. I vaguely I saw the second picture when I first got the car.

How does everyone's screen looks like?





 

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2022 Honda Civic Sport (Aegean Blue)
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This is normal.. why push higher RPMs when you don't need it? That is the benifit and point of a CVT. To keep you in the optimal RPMs for efficiency. Push the pedal to the floor and watch it screem to higher RPMs to fulfill the demand.
 

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‘22 Civic Sport Hatchback in Boost Blue Pearl
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The 1k and 2k rpm numbers are lit up because your needle is close to them. Whatever rpm number your needle is closest to will light up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My car is still in break in period. I suppose to drive it at different rpm after the first a couple hundred miles. So, I was wondering how to get up to 3k, 4k rpm.
 

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My EX-L has S on the shifter, and L in addition to D. S for sport, which will keep the revs a bit higher than drive. L for low, even higher revs (not sure if L will limit your upper speeds due to staying in a lower transmission ratio range, but assume so). You don't want to be redlining it for break in but you can drop it down on occasion to bring the revs up. I did that sometimes for instance going up medium hills, which gives it a load. Not that long, not over 4k until over 500 miles. (still have not gone to redline yet, gonna wait for that to at least 1,500 mi or so- and possibly not even then)
 

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2022 Si Blazing Orange Pearl
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I noticed you have Eco on, I’m pretty sure that having your car in Eco mode like that will also have an effect on the artificial rpm limiting to maintain that optimal efficiency. Since Eco encourages the engine to run at lower RPM, I would push the gas more when I ran my Fit in Eco mode I ended up with less mpg than in normal mode.

TL;DR- try turning off Eco mode and seeing if it raises your RPMs?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I noticed you have Eco on, I’m pretty sure that having your car in Eco mode like that will also have an effect on the artificial rpm limiting to maintain that optimal efficiency. Since Eco encourages the engine to run at lower RPM, I would push the gas more when I ran my Fit in Eco mode I ended up with less mpg than in normal mode.

TL;DR- try turning off Eco mode and seeing if it raises your RPMs?
Those are not my photos. I don't run on eco mode.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
My EX-L has S on the shifter, and L in addition to D. S for sport, which will keep the revs a bit higher than drive. L for low, even higher revs (not sure if L will limit your upper speeds due to staying in a lower transmission ratio range, but assume so). You don't want to be redlining it for break in but you can drop it down on occasion to bring the revs up. I did that sometimes for instance going up medium hills, which gives it a load. Not that long, not over 4k until over 500 miles. (still have not gone to redline yet, gonna wait for that to at least 1,500 mi or so- and possibly not even then)
You are right. S does raise the RPM. I have never run any cat to the red line and I am not going to do it on this car.
 

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That is true, it is when you go past redline that you can cause problems. That, and not being there all the time lol. I have had my V-65 Magna play redline tag often through it's life, but where I am living now, there are much fewer areas where the traffic or roads would encourage it. But anyway, have fun with your Civic even with low variation in RPM, it is a nice car!
 

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There is a reason why so many manufacturers have moved to DIT engines and CVT trannies. And low-speed pre-ignition has been a problem with these powertrain combos. RPMS are kept as low as possible for fuel efficiency and emissions reasons. You have the ability to keep things in higher rpms if you like, just adjust your driving style.

I would always tell my son that if he wants to accelerate quickly hit the downshift paddle (to raise rpms) then push moderately on the throttle. If you just mash the throttle from a low rpm cruise you will create the conditions for low speed pre-ignition to flourish. Get the rpms up, and then load up the engine, not the other way around.

Don't be afraid of redline or high rpms, these motors have such a low rpm limit given their small size, they could easily rev to 7k+ if the manufacturer allowed for it, but there wouldn't be much benefit in terms of power levels, though it would be perfectly safe.
 

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2022 Civic Hatchback ST 6MT
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There is a reason why so many manufacturers have moved to DIT engines and CVT trannies. And low-speed pre-ignition has been a problem with these powertrain combos. RPMs are kept as low as possible for fuel efficiency and emissions reasons. You have the ability to keep things in higher rpms if you like, just adjust your driving style.

I would always tell my son that if he wants to accelerate quickly hit the downshift paddle (to raise rpms) then push moderately on the throttle. If you just mash the throttle from a low rpm cruise you will create the conditions for low speed pre-ignition to flourish. Get the rpms up, and then load up the engine, not the other way around.

Don't be afraid of redline or high rpms, these motors have such a low rpm limit given their small size
, they could easily rev to 7k+ if the manufacturer allowed for it, but there wouldn't be much benefit in terms of power levels, though it would be perfectly safe.
TLDR, you will never get peak power from the LX sedan without entering Sport mode and pinning the throttle to redline. Whether or not you care about doing so, is up to you. (It's probably worth it to trigger it at least a few times just to make sure you know HOW to do it if you feel like it, but that's just me.)

The boldfaced comments are why I sought out the six-speed manual for this car, LOL. Well, for the Sport Touring HB - there is no manual option for the Civic sedan without going to the Si.

That said, with the 1.5T there is no benefit to running my ST to redline - short shifting at 6000 RPM is about right (peak HP).

With the 2.0 NA engine in the LX, I believe what power there is, is delivered linearly to redline, as peak horsepower is at 6500 RPM.

If fuel efficiency is your primary concern, of course, you can just stay under 4000 (or 3000) RPM to get max MPG out of the car, you'll just never really accelerate very quickly (whether from a full stop or to pass at speed).

The CVT will optimize for the latter, which is why you would not see the RPMs in the LX go very high even in "Normal" mode (though what you described in the OP sounded a lot more like "Econ" mode).
 
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