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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've never gotten a flat with over 200k miles driven *knock on wood. However, my most recent car doesn't have a spare, doesn't have run flat tires, and just has a air pump and flat repair kit in the trunk. Always gives me anxiety!

Does the Si have a spare tire under the trunk floor?
 

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On many of my Hondas I pulled the spare tires and carried fix a flat cans and the air pumps. I have driven well over a million miles and never had a flat tire that caused me to pull over, I've had many slow leaks with nails in tires but never a blowout or sudden fast leak. I know it could happen tomorrow as you never know when it can happen but it is pretty rare to have a complete blowout or fast flat.

To be perfectly honest one of the easiest ways to get killed is to change a tire on the side of the road, drivers passing you tend fixate on your position and they slowly gravitate towards you without knowing. I did many road trip vacations and I always carried fix a flat kits, if you get a flat you fill the tire quickly and get on your way, much safer IMO. In the rare case you get a bad blowout you have roadside assistance, and possibly road hazard warranties.
 

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My Si has the compact spare tire with tools. I wish it came with the tire repair pump /kit instead, but no we get the compact spare tire. Must be a Canadian difference. I'd gladly trade my spare tire for the repair kit.
 

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In all seriousness, if I own a US model, then where can I go to buy a spare tire? It's absolutely mind boggling that Honda would sell a car without one.
On the Si accessories page at the Honda website, there is no option to buy a spare tire. But I assume all Si have the same hole in the trunk to store one?
 

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In all seriousness, if I own a US model, then where can I go to buy a spare tire? It's absolutely mind boggling that Honda would sell a car without one.
It is not that uncommon, I owned Dodge SRT4's that came with air pumps and repair kits back in 2004, the Honda S2000 had the same back in the 2008 range, I think some Corvettes came with run flat tires and omitted the spare. I've said it in some other posts that I'd rather do a quick fill and repair of my tire rather than changing it on the side of the road for safety reasons. With a manual transmission and a front flat tire, you also need to remove the rear tire, put the spare on the rear, then put the rear full size tire on the front axle, the spare tire is not to be used on the front axle, so twice the time and effort needed if you have a front flat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
It is not that uncommon, I owned Dodge SRT4's that came with air pumps and repair kits back in 2004, the Honda S2000 had the same back in the 2008 range, I think some Corvettes came with run flat tires and omitted the spare. I've said it in some other posts that I'd rather do a quick fill and repair of my tire rather than changing it on the side of the road for safety reasons. With a manual transmission and a front flat tire, you also need to remove the rear tire, put the spare on the rear, then put the rear full size tire on the front axle, the spare tire is not to be used on the front axle, so twice the time and effort needed if you have a front flat.
The tiny S2000 had a spare tire in the trunk

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A Bridgestone Tire survey conducted about 10 years ago discovered about 85% of spare tires/wheels/tools are still unused when cars are scrapped. If the inflator/sealant kit's directions are followed, they are capable of temporarily sealing around the puncturing item in most cases. It is important to leave the cause-of-a-tread-area puncture (screw, nail, accident debris, etc.) in the tire when using the inflator/sealant kit. However, inflator/sealant kits will not typically seal major tread or sidewall cuts, nor pothole rim-impact damage.

While the odds favor not having a spare, I believe it is important to have an earlier warning system to discover air pressure loss before it becomes critical. The original equipment indirect TPMS only has to issue an alarm/warning after a 25% pressure loss (about 25 psi) is detected. I have chosen to run an additional aftermarket direct TPMS that attaches to the valve stem in place of a normal valve cap. It provides a constant tire pressure readout in the cockpit and an audible alarm if the tire pressure drops below 29 psi (about 10% low). I think of it as, "a stitch in time" proposition, further improving my odds.

The pictures are of the aftermarket TPMS on my wife's 2018 Honda CR-V.

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